NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY - FARGO, N D

3D ANAGLYPH OF THE
RED RIVER VALLEY,
NORTH DAKOTA -
MINNESOTA -
SOUTH DAKOTA

A pair of red / blue 3D glasses is required to view this anaglyph. Please note that the red lens should be over the left eye.

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This anaglyph was produced by Ray Sterner of the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University using USGS DEM data.

The east-west distance across the image is approximately 90 miles, and the north-south distance is about 200 miles. The image covers portions of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota. The city of Fargo, ND, lies at the approximate center of the image. Although the actual vertical relief across the image is something less than 500 feet, the vertical exaggeration perceived in the image is much, much higher (300X).

The Red River Valley trends north-south across the image. The Valley is actually the bed of glacial Lake Agassiz, an enormous ice-dammed lake that developed at the end of the last ice age. The Red River of the North drains northward along the axis of the Valley. The clay-rich soils that underlie the Valley are among the richest in the world, supporting crops that include wheat, barley, sugar beets, and sunflowers. Morainic uplands surround all sides of the Valley.

Well expressed toward the bottom third of the anaglyph is the "delta" (actually a submarine fan) constructed by the Sheyenne River as it fed sediments into Lake Agassiz. The Sheyenne River has sinced entrenched itself in a northeast-trending valley across the "delta."

The Coteau des Prairies (Prairie Coteau), a bedrock upland thickly draped by glacial sediments, forms the wedge-shaped landform whose point just juts into southeastern North Dakota. Just to the east of the Coteau is a deep valley (today occupied, in part, by Lake Traverse and Big Stone Lake) that was carved by the "River Warren": the river that drained Lake Agassiz.


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